Марат Сафин

Мария Шарапова

Дмитрий Турсунов

Женский теннис

ТОП 10 в теннисе

  • Roger Federer (11,350)
  • Novak Djokovic (8,310)
  • Rafael Nadal (7,440)
  • Andy Murray (7,255)
  • Juan Martin Del Potro (6,275)
  • Nikolay Davydenko (5,290)
  • Robin Soderling (3,905)
  • Andy Roddick (3,720)
  • Marin Cilic (2,970)
  • Fernando Gonzalez (2,925)

Авторизация

Члены ассоциации

Теннис Онлайн

2007-07-30 14:00:03
Blueberry написал(а):
La belle Brunette написал(а):

Заявив, что его теннис стал более стабильным, россиянин оговорился и сказал, что «вырос как личность». Но и здесь острый на язык теннисист сумел выкрутиться: «А я имел в виду именно то, что сказал. Я стал привлекательнее. Вы даже понятия не имеете, сколько девчонок мне названивает».

вот здесь :fool:

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Осень опять надевается с рукавов,
Электризует волосы - ворот узок.
Мальчик мой, я надеюсь, что ты здоров
И бережёшься слишком больших нагрузок.
Мир кладёт тебе в книги душистых слов,
А в динамики - новых музык.
Город после лета стоит худым,
Зябким, как в семь утра после вечеринки.
Ничего не движется, даже дым.
Только птицы под небом плавают, как чаинки,
И прохожий смеется паром, уже седым.

В ролевой-Дмитрий Т.,Андрей Ч.,Анна Ч.,Новак Дж.,Настя М.,мама АнИ,Алена Б.,Доминика Ц.,Вика А.,Ксю,Крис А.,Флавия П.,Андрей П.

2007-07-30 15:39:54
Volna... написал(а):
La belle Brunette написал(а):

вот здесь

:blush2:

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Остановить мужчину взглядом? Легко...Вопрос - стОит ли...

In Guus we trust

В ролевой - Игорь А., Саша В., Мария Ш., Настя М., мама АнИ, Арно К.

2007-07-30 20:10:46
Blueberry написал(а):

The Great Kisser Embraces Indy Championship

By Joshua Rey
07/30/2007

When Dmitry Tursunov arrived to the Indianapolis Tennis Center Saturday, a daunting task awaited him. It had little to do with his 11 a.m. quarterfinal opponent Kei Nishikori, who still doesn’t have the power to compete with the top level ATP pros. Tursunov was due to play a semifinal later Saturday with the winner advancing to Sunday’s final. 

He could have faced a top 10 American doubleheader in James Blake and Andy Roddick. Instead he played 90th-ranked Sam Querrey and 109th-ranked Frank Dancevic.

The usually-confident Tursunov, whose ATP blog includes pictures of him in a T-shirt that reads "Great Kisser," wasn’t overlooking anyone at an upset-filled Indianapolis Tennis Championships.

"I can’t say that playing Frank is better than playing Roddick," Tursunov said Saturday following his semifinal win against Querrey. "Obviously, Andy is higher-ranked but today he wasn’t as good as Frank. Maybe Andy’s results have been a little more consistent than Frank’s, but that doesn’t cancel that Frank can come out tomorrow and play better than Roger (Federer)."

Against Roddick, Dancevic emulated Federer well, making a majority of his returns and bringing the American to the net to set up his passing shots. On Sunday, however, Dancevic was anything but Federer-like, falling 6-4, 7-5 in the first final of his career. After breaking Roddick’s serve twice during Saturday’s semifinal, Dancevic couldn’t reach break point against the Russian.

"I was a bit tighter going out today," said Dancevic. "It was my first final and I felt a little nervous."

The Canadian’s nerves showed on Tursunov’s serves as Dancevic lost all 26 points when the 27th-ranked Tursunov made his first serve.

Dancevic also appeared to feel the butterflies on his own serve. At 1-all, 40-15 Dancevic serve-and-volleyed but couldn’t handle the pace of Tursunov’s blistering forehand return. One point later, on a second serve, the Canadian again serve-and-volleyed but failed to make a half volley when Tursunov hit a forehand at his feet. Dancevic chose to stay back the next two points but had no better luck as Tursunov gained the first break of the match when the Canadian netted a forehand.

"Pretty much, on my serve I made my own errors," said Dancevic. "I didn’t really do anything special on my serve. I just came up with my own mistakes and it cost me the match."

Tursunov, who arrived in Indianapolis with a 14-13 record, breezed through his service games in the first set. He held for 3-1 and 4-2 with service winners. The Russian is one of the game’s best-kept secrets, a talented shotmaker who scouts each of his opponents intelligently, taking what they give him.

He had Dancevic’s slice backhand return well-scouted after the Canadian used it to agitate an impatient Roddick on Saturday. On set point at 5-4, 40-30, Tursunov hit his second serve to Dancevic’s backhand wing. Predictably, Dancevic sliced the return, allowing Tursunov to move up in the court and dictate the rally before pummeling a crosscourt forehand that the Canadian barely got a racket on.

"If I wanted him to go for his shots, then I’d go more to his forehand," said Tursunov. "If I was going to his backhand, I was expecting some sort of a chip or a short ball. Knowing how he was going to respond from whichever side he was returning from was a big advantage because I could be ready for the next shot and plan out the point."

Tursunov made just 37 percent of his first serves in the first set, but prevailed 6-4 largely because he targeted Dancevic’s backhand with his second serve. He’s often prone to breaking a racquet or arguing with the chair umpire when things aren’t going his way, as he did in his quarterfinal against Nishikori. But Tursunov kept his cool Sunday, despite his poor serving performance.

"I was pleased with the fact that I got the job done because a few years ago I probably would have been losing my composure out there, to say the least," said Tursunov. "I’d be lucky enough to walk off the court with just one racquet after serving the way I did. But today was a completely different story."

The Russian nearly broke the match wide open when he earned two more break points at 2-all in the second set. Dancevic saved the first with a 133 mile-per-hour service winner and the second with another bold serve-and-volley play off a second serve. After hitting a drop volley, Dancevic could only watch as Tursunov rushed to the ball and whipped a cross court forehand that barely missed going over the net.

"I was just trying to mix it up a bit," said Dancevic, who took a 3-2 lead when Tursunov hit a poor drop shot. "He seemed like he was on my serve the whole match so I figured I’d change the rhythm."

Dancevic struggled with his serve throughout the match, making just 45 percent of his first serves. Tursunov raised his first serve percentage to 59 percent in the second set, losing just three points in six service games.

"I didn’t return as well as I would have liked today," said Dancevic. "I returned a little bit better against Andy yesterday when I was getting a lot more balls in play. [Tursunov] was also mixing his serve up really well and he picked his serve up as the match went on."

Down break point at 5-all, 30-40, Dancevic again chose to serve and volley. His backhand stab failed to rattle Tursunov, who this time made his cross court forehand for the crucial break. The Russian was surprised that Dancevic continued to serve and volley on key points.

"I definitely didn’t expect that," said Tursunov. "At the end of the day, if you count how many break points he would win that way out of 10, I think that’s a very low percentage… That showed me that he didn’t feel comfortable staying at the baseline and rallying with me, which was a good sign."

Serving for just the second title of his career, Tursunov showed no signs of the player who’s struggled to return to form after tearing a tendon in his left wrist during the Australian Open. In his semifinal match against Querrey, Tursunov served for the first set at 5-4 but double faulted on break point. Then, with a set point at 6-4 in the first set tiebreaker, he double faulted again.

There was none of that in the final. Tursunov hit a 135 mile-per-hour service winner, a monstrous down-the-line forehand winner, a 133 mile-per-hour service winner and a 127 mile-per-hour service winner to clinch the championship and $73,000.

"I remembered how stressing it was to play a tiebreak after serving for the set and there was no way in hell I was going to go through that again," Tursunov said. "It’s hard sometimes to predict how you’re going to react because you can tell yourself, ‘It’s just another point. It’s just another game,’ and then shank everything into the stands. By the same token, you can come out and think you’re going to be tense and play unbelievable.

"I was up a break and I had nothing to lose and everything to gain so I was just trying to relax and not double fault."

Dancevic will leave Indianapolis with $42,800 more than he drove here with, enough to buy first-class plane tickets back to Niagara Falls for him, his parents and his three sisters.

"I’ve got to take the car back," he said before starting to laugh. "I’m not going to buy a new car with the paycheck."

The Dancevic family woke up at 4 a.m. this morning and followed Frank’s car tracks, making the nine hour drive to Indiana. Dancevic warmed up for the final with his 20-year-old sister Monika, who finished her sophomore season at the University of Georgia as the 35th-ranked player in the country.

He’ll now head to Montreal where Tennis Canada would be hard-pressed not to give him a wild card to the Rogers Masters after his surprising performance this week. The last man in the draw was one of the last two to leave it.

"Going into this tournament, I was happy with my first round win against Benjamin Becker," Dancevic said of his 6-4, 6-3 victory over the 47th-ranked player in the world. "I gained a lot of confidence from that, having not beaten a guy in the top 50 for four years. Even more than confidence, I believe that I can play with these guys."

Tursunov knows that feeling well. After breaking out for his first title in Mumbai last fall, he’d been unable to recover from his early-season injury, losing nine of 12 matches before playing on the grass courts of Great Britain.

This week, he never looked like the player whose devastating forehand drove the typically cool-and-collected Federer to scream, "Shit!" during a tight three-setter at the 2006 Rogers Masters. Swinging away with all his might that night, Tursunov walked away a loser.

But it was Tursunov who said "shit" on Sunday after initially telling the Indianapolis crowd there wasn't a check inside his champion's envelope. A tournament official showed him otherwise. Tursunov played within himself in Indianapolis, and for that, he’s walking away a champion.

"Now I know that I can win matches when I’m not playing well," said Tursunov. "Knowing that you can come out and, you might not play great, but at the end of the day — if you do everything right — there’s a good chance that you can win."

Подпись автора

Осень опять надевается с рукавов,
Электризует волосы - ворот узок.
Мальчик мой, я надеюсь, что ты здоров
И бережёшься слишком больших нагрузок.
Мир кладёт тебе в книги душистых слов,
А в динамики - новых музык.
Город после лета стоит худым,
Зябким, как в семь утра после вечеринки.
Ничего не движется, даже дым.
Только птицы под небом плавают, как чаинки,
И прохожий смеется паром, уже седым.

В ролевой-Дмитрий Т.,Андрей Ч.,Анна Ч.,Новак Дж.,Настя М.,мама АнИ,Алена Б.,Доминика Ц.,Вика А.,Ксю,Крис А.,Флавия П.,Андрей П.

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